HPSN UK 2018

Nottingham, UK

June 20-21


DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway

Registration: Free

Announcements


Choose from three registration options

Session abstract submission deadline is April 28

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From Training to Practice: Simulation Comes of Age


Join us in June to celebrate and network with educators, technologists, technicians, facilitators, nurses, doctors, midwives, allied health, patient safety leads et al, to celebrate the technology and education behind using this pedagogy to improve and enhance patient care. The two-day conference is free to attend and welcomes all-comers to healthcare simulation. 

June 20th - Focus on Simulation Technologies The first-day features presentations and interactive workshops focused on the technologies surrounding simulation in healthcare education. 

June 21st - Focus on Education Strategies The second day brings together leading healthcare educators from around the globe for interactive workshops and presentations. 

Join us for both days to... Read More

Register Now!

Venue &
Accommodations


DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway offers a peaceful retreat in a natural wildlife haven and is three miles from the city center

 

Nuthall Road, Nottingham
NG8 6AZ, United Kingdom 

TEL: +44-115-9794949

Agenda


June 20th - Focus on Simulation Technologies 

Features presentations and interactive workshops focused on the technologies surrounding simulation in health care education. 

June 21st - Focus on Education Strategies 

Brings together leading healthcare educators from around the globe for interactive workshops and presentations. 

*Agenda Subject to Change

June 20, 2018

Registration - Tea & Coffee

Welcome - Opening Remarks

Keynote Presentation

Interactive Stations (15 minutes each rotation)

Tea & Coffee in Product Showcase

Interactive Stations (15 minutes each rotation)

Lunch

Technology Workshops I

Technology Workshops II

Tea & Coffee in Product Showcase

Keynote Presentation

Technology Round Table

Drinks Reception

June 21, 2018

Registration - Tea & Coffee

Welcome - Opening Remarks

Keynote Presentation

Tea & Coffee in Product Showcase

Concurrent Session I

Concurrent Session II

Lunch and Exhibition

Electronic Poster Walk

ASPiH

Keynote

Tea & Coffee in Product Showcase

Demonstration

Closing Session

Speakers


Wednesday June 20

Dr Richard Helyer

 

Thursday June 21

Mr Nicholas Gosling

Dr Paul Diprose

Richard Helyer

Richard Helyer

Richard is a Senior Teaching Fellow and Academic Lead at the University of Bristol Biomedical Simulation Centre. He specialises in the application of high-fidelity human patient simulation to the teaching of basic biomedical principles that underpin medicine, dentistry and veterinary sciences. With over 20 years experience in higher education and over 10 years in simulation, his most recent work focuses on applying high-fidelity models such as Muse to produce learning modules that demonstrate core aspects of...

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Dr Paul Diprose FRCSEd FRCA FFICM

Dr Paul Diprose FRCSEd FRCA FFICM

Paul Diprose is a consultant cardiac anaesthetist and intensivist at University Hospitals Southampton NHS Trust. Following initial experience in surgery and emergency medicine, he trained in anaesthesia in hospitals in the south of England and at the Green Lane cardiac unit in Auckland, New Zealand.  He has been the lead for peri-operative echocardiography in Southampton since his substantive consultant appointment in 2006. He has an interest in the use of high-fidelity simulation to teach TEE...

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Content


Keynote Speakers

Keynote Speakers

We are delighted to bring two keynote speakers to this year's conference to cover the themes of simulation technologies and education strategies. More details can be found above.

Day One Technology

Day One Technology

Day One of the conference will see a range of interactive workshops for the technological and creative minds out there. 

Welcome Reception

Welcome Reception

Help us to Kick off HPSN UK 2018 by joining us for food, fun and drinks in the Product Showcase (Lavendar Lounge) Either Tuesday, 19th or Wednesday, June 20th at 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

Day Two Concurrent Sessions

Day Two Concurrent Sessions

Day Two of the conference will see a range of oral presentations, workshops and posters on simulation education strategies as a part of our concurrent sessions. Choose wisely.

View Sessions

Day Two Concurrent Sessions


Presented By: Gabriel Stalnaker, University of Connecticut

Lead Author: Gabriel Stalnaker, University of Connecticut Simulation Lab Manager and Information Technology Specialist (Storrs, CT, United States)

Co-Author: Carrie Morgan Eaton, PhD, RNC-OB, C-EFM, CHSE, University of Connecticut Director of Simulation Education and Nursing Undergraduate Learning Community (Storrs, CT, United States)

Conflict of Interest: The authors, Gabriel Stalnaker and Carrie Eaton have no conflict of interest to disclose.

Ethics Statement: The authors declare we have followed the guidelines for scientific integrity and professional ethics. This presentation does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects.

This abstract has not been previously published. This will be the first presentation of this content. Gabriel Stalnaker and Carrie Eaton consent to publication of this content.

Introduction and Aims:
There is a vast and impressive amount of available technology that allows simulation departments to be productive and innovative. However, an organizational foundation is necessary to build a successful program. Nursing staff and faculty recognize the value of simulation as a teaching-learning modality, but establishing systematic approaches to organization requires strong technical support from a simulation technology operator or specialist.  “Simulator operators tend to be the “behind the scenes” personnel whose work often goes unrecognized and unrewarded” (Gantt, 2012, p. 579).  In simulation pedagogy, an organized technical foundation is imperative in order to leverage the capacity of the complex simulation environment. This presentation aims to explore technical solutions created by an academic simulation lab manager / IT specialist for supporting faculty via an innovative organization program. We aim to bring together individuals with interest in simulation organization to discuss, share knowledge, gather insights and strategies on how to build an organized technical foundation to support simulation in academia. A secondary aim of this presentation is to demonstrate how a solid organized technical foundation in simulation has instilled consistency, independence, confidence, and competence in faculty working in simulation education.

Session Description:
This presentation will include a dynamic PowerPoint presentation including pictures and video of the University of Connecticut simulation program.

Educational Methods:
Brainstorming / Networking
PowerPoint Lecture

Expected Impact:
This presentation is expected to have an impact on the contribution of technical simulation organization as the foundation of successful teamwork among simulation technologists, faculty, staff, and directors.

References:
Gantt, L. (2012). Who’s driving? the role and training of the human patient simulation operator. CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 30(11), 579-586. doi:10.1097/NXN.0b013e318266ca52
Moores, B., & Patel, A. P. (2015). Technical infrastructure. Defining excellence in simulation programs (pp. 465-478) Wolters Kluwer.

Presented By: Aishi Lim, Epsom and St Helier NHS Trust. Epsom ,UK.

Interprofessional training has come more prominent over the last decade particularly within the United Kingdom. Often, establishing joint training courses in medicine can be challenging but extremely beneficial to both staff and patients. Taking examples from established courses in medicine, nursing, obstetrics, paediatric and accident and emergency in a District General Hospital setting we hope to highlight the immense value of interprofessional training and provide inspiration to simulation providers to apply these principles in their own settings.

Presented By: Dennis Valdez, Mount Royal University | Sheldon Thunstrom, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology | Diane Dleikan, University of Calgary

The pilot study evaluated student perceptions of a new Socio­Ecological Model of First Responder Care in the development of Interprofessional Competencies during a simulated pre­hospital emergency.

Cohorts of third year Athletic Therapy and first year paramedic students observed two simulated prehospital emergencies and assessed the technical and non­technical skills of an athletic therapy team working with a team of two paramedics, respectively. Each simulated emergency consisted of one standardized patient, two athletic therapy students and two paramedic students. Both simulations involved one spine­injured hockey player (standardized patient) on different areas of a hockey ice rink.

Four instruments were completed by all participants. The Student Stereotype Rating Questionnaire (SSRQ) measured health care students’ perceptions of a different profession using nine items and a 5­pt Scale (Ateah et al., 2011). The MiniCEX measured technical and non­ technical skills performance using sixteen items and a 10­pt scale (Ansari, Ali, & Donnon, 2013). The TEAM measured teamwork performance using eleven items and a 6­pt scale (Cooper et al., 2010). A Learning Activity Feedback Survey provided feedback to the facilitators regarding the logistics of the activity.

The learning activity consisted of a pre­simulation form completion period, an emergency medical simulation where role players are evaluated by observers, and a post­simulation form completion period. All participants completed the SSRQ prior to and following the simulation. During simulation, the athletic therapy student observers evaluated the athletic therapy role players using the MiniCEX (Athletic Therapy), and the paramedic student observers evaluated the paramedic role players using the MiniCEX (EMT­P). All observers used the TEAM form to evaluate the interactions between athletic therapy and paramedic role players. Following the simulation, observers and role players completed the SSRQ and Learning Activity Feedback Survey.

Future data will be analysed using descriptive statistics procedures and qualitative data will be analyzed using thematic analysis. Participants expressed perceived value in the exercise and provided suggestions to improve the activity during the formal data collection period (2017­2018). 

Presented By: Gill Langmack, University of Nottingham | Jennifer Wallace, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust | Aaron Fecowycz, University of Nottingham

Generation Z is staring to infiltrate the workforce.  As a digitally and tech savvy group, learning is needing to transform into shorter, more visual learning so providing an ‘experience’, yet it needs to provide opportunities to develop the depth and breadth of knowledge required to treat and care for patients.  21st century learners also appear to be less resilient when encountering a new or unfamiliar situations, particularly when presented with the reality of a specialist area such as theatres.  

We will present a peer reviewed, Reusable Learning Object that provides student nurses with the option to explore the highly specialised environment prior to undertaking placements.  Within this, the innovative use of a 360° Camera enables the learner to explore the environment in safety, familiarising themselves with the equipment, before entering it to work.

Vital to this development in e-learning is the collaboration between learning technologist and clinical colleagues.  Digital learning is then developed to explore the clinical environment using a validated, e-learning tool accessible on a variety of platforms, including smartphones.

Objectives

To discuss the opportunities of using innovative technologies in enhancing learning

To explore the pedagogy of using innovative technologies

To consider the differing digital fads and vagaries of changing generations

Sierra Leone, post Ebola, had lost over 4000 people to Ebola Virus Disease; approximately 11% of these were healthcare workers. They had a crippled healthcare system, and no national or local infection prevention and control policy (IPC). Healthcare workers did not know how to protect themselves and their communities. The World Health Organisation (WHO) with the Sierra Leone Department of Health, developed the countries first IPC policy, and was then faced with the massive task of rolling it out across the nation.

The International Organisation of Migration undertook to train and support 21 non-government healthcare facilities in phase one of this project. I was responsible for five healthcare facilities in the Western Area State with a team of 6 local staff including doctors, nurses and water and sanitation experts.

Our role was to do an assessment of each healthcare facility, identify gaps, train all clinical and non-clinical staff in the new IPC policy, and oversee the implementation of the new policy and equipment.

Our main challenge in assisting healthcare workers to implement these immensely important changes was not in their basic understanding of what to do, but in affecting the culture of the work place, and understanding the implications of what could potentially happen if they didn’t. Five weeks after the training was complete, we were still struggling with this, when I decided to introduce insitu simulation into our program.

I trained simulated patients who presented at triage reporting signs and symptoms that fitted into the WHO Suspect Ebola case definition.  I followed these patients through triage and the subsequent progression of their care, noting in particular; procedures for donning and doffing personal protective equipment (PPE); communication with appropriate key stakeholders; communication with the patient and other patients/relatives present; identifying latent threats in processes in each health care centre; and adherence to Suspect Ebola pathways. Once the patient was safely isolated, and PPE was removed, we held an inter-professional group debrief.

The result of these simulations saw the biggest change yet in healthcare workers attitudes and desire to make changes within their facilities. In the debrief, participants self-identified issues that needed changes, flaws in the process and how they could improve the system to protect themselves and their communities. Participants became engaged in discussing ways they could improve and sustain good practices with an enthusiasm we had not yet witnessed through the program.

Aims and objectives:

To use simulation as an approach to teaching and learning of cardiac and respiratory physiology to help students to understand and apply their knowledge in patient assessment. This impacts their knowledge application in their clinical decision making in their patient assessment which influences overall positive patient outcome. 


Background:

Application of acquired knowledge in cardiac and respiratory physiology to patient care is difficult due to infrequent exposure in practice placement for undergraduate nursing students. This creates an opportunity to teach cardiac physiology using the simulation teaching approach through Human Physiology Software which recreates clinical scenarios to help students to understand and apply their knowledge in patient care.  

Design:

This is a quantitative descriptive design.

Methods:

A convenience sample of 106 undergraduate adult nursing students were divided into two groups with the interventional group receiving both the traditional and simulation approach to teaching in cardiac and respiratory physiology using Human Physiology Software. The non- interventional group received traditional didactic teaching on cardiac and respiratory physiology.   Students’ assessment scores on two modules were analysed using SPSS.

Details


Travel Details

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway offers a peaceful retreat in a natural wildlife haven and is three miles from the city center

 

Nuthall Road, Nottingham
NG8 6AZ, United Kingdom 

TEL: +44-115-9794949

For more details on how to reach the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham-Gateway- please click here 
Please note there are 250 free parking spots available to delegates on the site. 

Travellers from afar:


By Air:

If you are traveling by air-there are a few airports that service the Nottingham area.

East Midlands is 15 miles from the hotel and estimated 20 minutes away.

Birmingham Airport is 50 miles from the hotel and estimated 50 minutes away.

Doncaster Sheffield Airport is 49 miles from the hotel and estimated 60 minutes away. 

 

By Train:

If you are traveling by train- please note that the Nottingham Train Station is a taxi ride away. The estimate price for a taxi is about £8-£12. For information and schedules - click here

If you are traveling by the Nottingham Tram- please note that the cloesest stops to the hotel are Cinderhill and Phoenix Park.   Please note that you must purchase your tickets before boarding on their website

Hotel Details

The official venue and conference hotel for HPSN UK 2018 is DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham-Gateway.

We are offering HPSN attendees a speical rate of £125/night Bed & Breakfast subject to availability. Click here to reserve your room

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway
Nuthall Road, Nottingham
NG8 6AZ, United Kingdom 
TEL: +44-115-9794949
FAX: +44-115-9797167

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Sponsors


Representative of a range of business entities and concerns, from corporate and governmental to private, public and not-for-profit, our sponsors provide the encouragement and assistance that helps HPSN deliver simulation-based learning and networking opportunities to the worldwide healthcare community. This year’s Human Patient Simulation Network Annual Conference (HPSN World 2017) provides several sponsorship opportunities to not only generate increased awareness for your products and services, but it also communicates a strong commitment to the guiding principles behind healthcare simulation.

Sponsorship Benefits

Sponsoring an HPSN World 2017 event will speak volumes to attendees, customers and potential investors about your company’s dedication to supporting simulation-based medical education for improving patient care. HPSN World 2017 offers tiered sponsorship opportunities to suit any budget. Contact us for details on Sponsorship Bundles to maximize the exposure of your brand.

Your logo on HPSN.com for one year
Multiple conference branding opportunities
Prominent listing as "Official Sponsor" of HPSN World 2017

Contact: Debra Roehl        Email: debra.roehl@cae.com        Tel: (941) 536-2850        Fax: (941) 377-5532        Attn: HPSN 2017 Convention SPONSORS

Exhibitors


Representative of a range of business entities and concerns, from corporate and governmental to private, public and not-for-profit, our sponsors provide the encouragement and assistance that helps HPSN deliver simulation-based learning and networking opportunities to the worldwide healthcare community. This year’s Human Patient Simulation Network Annual Conference (HPSN World 2017) provides several sponsorship opportunities to not only generate increased awareness for your products and services, but it also communicates a strong commitment to the guiding principles behind healthcare simulation.

Exhibitor Benefits

Exhibiting at an HPSN World 2017 event will speak volumes to attendees, customers and potential investors about your company’s dedication to supporting simulation-based medical education for improving patient care. HPSN World 2017 offers tiered sponsorship opportunities to suit any budget. Contact us for details on Sponsorship Bundles to maximize the exposure of your brand.

Access to more than 700 potential customers
Dedicated exhibit times
Daily traffic-boosting events

Contact: Sylva Sochor        Email: sylva.sochor@cae.com        Tel: (941) 536-2845        Fax: (941) 377-5532        Attn: HPSN 2017 Convention EXHIBITS