HPSN UK 2018

Nottingham, UK

June 20-21


DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway

Registration: Free

Announcements


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Session abstract submission deadline is April 28

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From Training to Practice: Simulation Comes of Age


Join us in June to celebrate and network with educators, technologists, technicians, facilitators, nurses, doctors, midwives, allied health, patient safety leads et al, to celebrate the technology and education behind using this pedagogy to improve and enhance patient care. The two-day conference is free to attend and welcomes all-comers to healthcare simulation. 

June 20th - Focus on Simulation Technologies The first-day features presentations and interactive workshops focused on the technologies surrounding simulation in healthcare education. 

June 21st - Focus on Education Strategies The second day brings together leading healthcare educators from around the globe for interactive workshops and presentations. 

Join us for both days to... Read More

Register Now!

Venue &
Accommodations


DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway offers a peaceful retreat in a natural wildlife haven and is three miles from the city center

 

Nuthall Road, Nottingham
NG8 6AZ, United Kingdom 

TEL: +44-115-9794949

Agenda


Day One - Focus on Simulation Technologies 

Features presentations and interactive workshops focused on the technologies surrounding simulation in health care education. 

Day Two - Focus on Education Strategies 

Brings together leading healthcare educators from around the globe for interactive workshops and presentations. 

*Agenda Subject to Change

June 20, 2018

Registration - Tea & Coffee

Welcome - Opening Remarks

Dr Robert Amyot - President CAE Healthcare

Keynote Presentation

Dr Richard Helyer

Groups Organised for 3 Interactive Rotation Sessions

Audio Visual / Augmented Reality / New Innovation

Tea & Coffee in Product Showcase

Interactive Stations - Rotation 1

Audio Visual / Augmented Reality / New Innovation

Interactive Stations - Rotation 2

Audio Visual / Augmented Reality / New Innovation

Interactive Stations - Rotation 3

Audio Visual / Augmented Reality / New Innovation

Lunch

Technical Clinic

Drop in sessions: Programming Tips / Simulator Repairs / How do I?

LearningSpace User Group Meeting

Technology Workshops I

Technology Workshops II

Tea & Coffee in Product Showcase

Keynote Presentation

Professor Bryn Baxendale

Plenary Session

Ms Jane Nicklin
Standard or First Class - the technician's journey!

Drinks Reception

June 21, 2018

Registration - Tea & Coffee

Welcome - Opening Remarks

Keynote Presentation

Dr Paul Diprose
Echocardiography simulation - engaging all members of the healthcare team

Tea & Coffee in Product Showcase

Technical Clinic

Drop in sessions: Programming Tips / Simulator Repairs / How do I?

Concurrent Session I

Concurrent Session II

Lunch and Exhibition

Electronic Poster Walk Begins 13:15

Keynote Presentation

Nicholas Gosling

ASPiH

Ms Ann Sunderland

Closing Session

Speakers


Wednesday June 20

Dr Richard Helyer

Professor Bryn Baxendale

Ms Jane Nicklin

 

Thursday June 21

Mr Nicholas Gosling

Dr Paul Diprose

Dr Richard Helyer

Dr Richard Helyer

Richard is a Senior Teaching Fellow and Academic Lead at the University of Bristol Biomedical Simulation Centre. He specialises in the application of high-fidelity human patient simulation to the teaching of basic biomedical principles that underpin medicine, dentistry and veterinary sciences. With over 20 years experience in higher education and over 10 years in simulation, his most recent work focuses on applying high-fidelity models such as Muse to produce learning modules that demonstrate core aspects of...

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Professor Bryn Baxendale

Professor Bryn Baxendale

Bryn was appointed as a consultant anaesthetist at NUH in 1998 and currently has clinical responsibilities related primarily to vascular and emergency surgical services at QMC. In 2009 he was appointed as an honorary professor by the School of Psychology at the University of Nottingham. He has been President of the Association of Simulated Practice in Healthcare since 2009, which is the national learned body in relation to the use of simulation and related innovative learning technologies to...

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Ms Jane Nicklin CertHE/ODP, MA Health Care Law, PGCE, FHEA

Ms Jane Nicklin CertHE/ODP, MA Health Care Law, PGCE, FHEA

Jane is the newly appointed Operations Manager at the Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare (ASPiH). She is working hard to improve membership experience and benefits, support the executive & accreditation committees and coordinate the annual conference and other regional events. She continues to be a strong advocate for simulation technicians; raising their profile through opportunities for professional registration and development, supporting groups/networks and was a key instigator in the recent proposal to develop...

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Mr Nicholas Gosling

Mr Nicholas Gosling

Nick is currently the head of St. George's Advanced Patient Simulation & Skills Centre at St. Georges University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Nick qualified as an Operating Department Practitioner in 1992 before moving into Education in the year 2000 where he successfully designed, implemented and managed both a 'best practice' Clinical Skills Laboratory and a Fixed and Mobile High Fidelity Advanced Patient Simulation Centre. Nick was part of the original London Deanery Foundation Programme initiative...

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Dr Paul Diprose FRCSEd FRCA FFICM

Dr Paul Diprose FRCSEd FRCA FFICM

Paul Diprose is a consultant cardiac anaesthetist and intensivist at University Hospitals Southampton NHS Trust. Following initial experience in surgery and emergency medicine, he trained in anaesthesia in hospitals in the south of England and at the Green Lane cardiac unit in Auckland, New Zealand.  He has been the lead for peri-operative echocardiography in Southampton since his substantive consultant appointment in 2006. He has an interest in the use of high-fidelity simulation to teach TEE...

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Content


Keynote Speakers

Keynote Speakers

We are delighted to bring four keynote speakers to this year's conference to cover the themes of simulation technologies and education strategies. In addition a number of pleanry speakers will be added to the programme. More details can be found above.

Day One Technology

Day One Technology

Day One of the conference will see a range of interactive workshops for the technological and creative minds out there. 

View Sessions

Day One Technology


Presented By: David Morgan, University of Bristol

n the BioMedSim Centre at the University of Bristol, technicians are facilitating student-centred learning due to improvements in accessibility and a reduction of technological constraints.   

We teach core concepts of whole body physiology and pharmacology. The HPS's reliance on constant supply of respiratory gas put constraints on our approach to teaching. Technicians would sit for hours in a darkened room behind a semi-transparent mirror, wearing a head-set, running HPS6 on an iMac.

Once we upgraded to mobile simulators iStan and Athena from CAE, we were able to re-evaluate the structure and style of our simulations.  Upgrading HPS6 software to muse has helped to encourage a student-centred approach because the interface is accessible, and intuitive.

Much of our latest tech is focused towards accessibility and can be student operated, such as large touchscreen devices and mixed reality displays. Our technicians engage in a more active/reactive method with students and academic staff, and are more heavily involved in planning and presenting content.

Discussion

Split into small groups.

How have technological advances changed your role?

Is student-centred learning a good fit for your learning environment?

Presented By: Karen Scullion, Lancashire teaching hospitals | Amanda Burton, Lancashire teaching hospitals | Mark Pimblett, Lancashire teaching hospitals | Chris Parry, Lancashire teaching hospitals | Aaron Ashford, Lancashire teaching hospitals | Winie Ellick, Lancashire teaching hospitals

Amanda Wilford has asked the team to provide a workshop that showcases Lucina birthing on all fours.  This provides conference attendees with insight into the versatility of Lucina and how they can incorporate this into their training sessions.  Proves that Lucina can be used by other health care pofessionals outside of the hospital setting, such as community midwives and paramedics.  Allows midwives to practise managing patients in realistic birthing positions, therefore improving competence and confidence which can lead to patient safety.

Lancashire Simulation Centre also have a simulated ambulance which they would like to bring to the conference to showcase their ability to provide realism for ambulance crews and hospital personal involved in transering patients.  The simbulance has cameras installed and can provide a live feed back to the classroom, this allows more people to learn through observation of the events taking place in the back of the simbulance. 

As the application of simulation in healthcare evolves, more simulation professionals strive to collaborate and develop new scenarios that meet interprofessional learning requirements and deliver the highest quality learning experience possible. More and more this requires collaboration between different groups or specialties. First and foremost, this requires teams to work together in an accessible, standardised way driven by learning outcomes.

This workshop will explore the challenges collaboration can present in scenario development. It will also present the web-based iRIS Simulation Authoring Platform as not only a solution to overcome these challenges, but as a platform to promote collaboration between simulation professionals in order to develop widely used and accepted high quality content without the need to “reinvent the wheel”.

iRIS will support you in:

• Ensuring your scenarios are developed in a standardised, high quality manner

• Creating significant efficiencies in terms of the time required for designing scenarios and collating simulation resources

• Reducing the time and effort required to train colleagues in the design and authoring of scenarios

• Building engagement with a wider range of clinicians to harness their expertise in developing new scenarios

• Driving interprofessional collaboration and sharing of content with other simulation professionals

Welcome Reception

Welcome Reception

Help us to Kick off HPSN UK 2018 by joining us for food, fun and drinks in the Product Showcase (Lavendar Lounge) Either Tuesday, 19th or Wednesday, June 20th at 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

Day Two Concurrent Sessions

Day Two Concurrent Sessions

Day Two of the conference will see a range of oral presentations, workshops and posters on simulation education strategies as a part of our concurrent sessions. Choose wisely.

View Sessions

Day Two Concurrent Sessions


Presented By: Gabriel Stalnaker, University of Connecticut

Lead Author: Gabriel Stalnaker, University of Connecticut Simulation Lab Manager and Information Technology Specialist (Storrs, CT, United States)

Co-Author: Carrie Morgan Eaton, PhD, RNC-OB, C-EFM, CHSE, University of Connecticut Director of Simulation Education and Nursing Undergraduate Learning Community (Storrs, CT, United States)

Conflict of Interest: The authors, Gabriel Stalnaker and Carrie Eaton have no conflict of interest to disclose.

Ethics Statement: The authors declare we have followed the guidelines for scientific integrity and professional ethics. This presentation does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects.

This abstract has not been previously published. This will be the first presentation of this content. Gabriel Stalnaker and Carrie Eaton consent to publication of this content.

Introduction and Aims:
There is a vast and impressive amount of available technology that allows simulation departments to be productive and innovative. However, an organizational foundation is necessary to build a successful program. Nursing staff and faculty recognize the value of simulation as a teaching-learning modality, but establishing systematic approaches to organization requires strong technical support from a simulation technology operator or specialist.  “Simulator operators tend to be the “behind the scenes” personnel whose work often goes unrecognized and unrewarded” (Gantt, 2012, p. 579).  In simulation pedagogy, an organized technical foundation is imperative in order to leverage the capacity of the complex simulation environment. This presentation aims to explore technical solutions created by an academic simulation lab manager / IT specialist for supporting faculty via an innovative organization program. We aim to bring together individuals with interest in simulation organization to discuss, share knowledge, gather insights and strategies on how to build an organized technical foundation to support simulation in academia. A secondary aim of this presentation is to demonstrate how a solid organized technical foundation in simulation has instilled consistency, independence, confidence, and competence in faculty working in simulation education.

Session Description:
This presentation will include a dynamic PowerPoint presentation including pictures and video of the University of Connecticut simulation program.

Educational Methods:
Brainstorming / Networking
PowerPoint Lecture

Expected Impact:
This presentation is expected to have an impact on the contribution of technical simulation organization as the foundation of successful teamwork among simulation technologists, faculty, staff, and directors.

References:
Gantt, L. (2012). Who’s driving? the role and training of the human patient simulation operator. CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 30(11), 579-586. doi:10.1097/NXN.0b013e318266ca52
Moores, B., & Patel, A. P. (2015). Technical infrastructure. Defining excellence in simulation programs (pp. 465-478) Wolters Kluwer.

Presented By: Aishi Lim, Epsom and St Helier NHS Trust. Epsom ,UK.

Interprofessional training has come more prominent over the last decade particularly within the United Kingdom. Often, establishing joint training courses in medicine can be challenging but extremely beneficial to both staff and patients. Taking examples from established courses in medicine, nursing, obstetrics, paediatric and accident and emergency in a District General Hospital setting we hope to highlight the immense value of interprofessional training and provide inspiration to simulation providers to apply these principles in their own settings.

Presented By: Dennis Valdez, Mount Royal University | Sheldon Thunstrom, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology | Diane Dleikan, University of Calgary

The pilot study evaluated student perceptions of a new Socio­Ecological Model of First Responder Care in the development of Interprofessional Competencies during a simulated pre­hospital emergency.

Cohorts of third year Athletic Therapy and first year paramedic students observed two simulated prehospital emergencies and assessed the technical and non­technical skills of an athletic therapy team working with a team of two paramedics, respectively. Each simulated emergency consisted of one standardized patient, two athletic therapy students and two paramedic students. Both simulations involved one spine­injured hockey player (standardized patient) on different areas of a hockey ice rink.

Four instruments were completed by all participants. The Student Stereotype Rating Questionnaire (SSRQ) measured health care students’ perceptions of a different profession using nine items and a 5­pt Scale (Ateah et al., 2011). The MiniCEX measured technical and non­ technical skills performance using sixteen items and a 10­pt scale (Ansari, Ali, & Donnon, 2013). The TEAM measured teamwork performance using eleven items and a 6­pt scale (Cooper et al., 2010). A Learning Activity Feedback Survey provided feedback to the facilitators regarding the logistics of the activity.

The learning activity consisted of a pre­simulation form completion period, an emergency medical simulation where role players are evaluated by observers, and a post­simulation form completion period. All participants completed the SSRQ prior to and following the simulation. During simulation, the athletic therapy student observers evaluated the athletic therapy role players using the MiniCEX (Athletic Therapy), and the paramedic student observers evaluated the paramedic role players using the MiniCEX (EMT­P). All observers used the TEAM form to evaluate the interactions between athletic therapy and paramedic role players. Following the simulation, observers and role players completed the SSRQ and Learning Activity Feedback Survey.

Future data will be analysed using descriptive statistics procedures and qualitative data will be analyzed using thematic analysis. Participants expressed perceived value in the exercise and provided suggestions to improve the activity during the formal data collection period (2017­2018). 

Presented By: Gill Langmack, University of Nottingham | Jennifer Wallace, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust | Aaron Fecowycz, University of Nottingham

Generation Z is staring to infiltrate the workforce.  As a digitally and tech savvy group, learning is needing to transform into shorter, more visual learning so providing an ‘experience’, yet it needs to provide opportunities to develop the depth and breadth of knowledge required to treat and care for patients.  21st century learners also appear to be less resilient when encountering a new or unfamiliar situations, particularly when presented with the reality of a specialist area such as theatres.  

We will present a peer reviewed, Reusable Learning Object that provides student nurses with the option to explore the highly specialised environment prior to undertaking placements.  Within this, the innovative use of a 360° Camera enables the learner to explore the environment in safety, familiarising themselves with the equipment, before entering it to work.

Vital to this development in e-learning is the collaboration between learning technologist and clinical colleagues.  Digital learning is then developed to explore the clinical environment using a validated, e-learning tool accessible on a variety of platforms, including smartphones.

Objectives

To discuss the opportunities of using innovative technologies in enhancing learning

To explore the pedagogy of using innovative technologies

To consider the differing digital fads and vagaries of changing generations

Aims and objectives:

To use simulation as an approach to teaching and learning of cardiac and respiratory physiology to help students to understand and apply their knowledge in patient assessment. This impacts their knowledge application in their clinical decision making in their patient assessment which influences overall positive patient outcome. 


Background:

Application of acquired knowledge in cardiac and respiratory physiology to patient care is difficult due to infrequent exposure in practice placement for undergraduate nursing students. This creates an opportunity to teach cardiac physiology using the simulation teaching approach through Human Physiology Software which recreates clinical scenarios to help students to understand and apply their knowledge in patient care.  

Design:

This is a quantitative descriptive design.

Methods:

A convenience sample of 106 undergraduate adult nursing students were divided into two groups with the interventional group receiving both the traditional and simulation approach to teaching in cardiac and respiratory physiology using Human Physiology Software. The non- interventional group received traditional didactic teaching on cardiac and respiratory physiology.   Students’ assessment scores on two modules were analysed using SPSS.

Presented By: Clair Merriman, Oxford Brookes University | Clare Butler, Oxford Brookes University | Rozz McDonald, Oxford Brookes University

Background:

The debrief in simulation-based education is widely recognised as the most important feature of simulated learning with the biggest influence on knowledge acquisition. The debrief is traditionally used as a final or end stage in a simulation process. However a limitation of this is that some opportunities for learning may be lost, and it restricts flexibility to respond to the learner in the way that is required and at the right time for learning to occur.

Description:

Throughout the course of our work we developed an alternative to debriefing in the final stage. We recognise learning moments as points in a simulated scenario that the learning outcomes and the actions of the learner(s) come together. The scenario is then paused by the facilitator allowing the learner to analyse the experience at the time of the event and construct new knowledge and understanding by unfolding the learning moment.

We liken the complexity of these unfolding learning moments to the origami ‘fortune teller’. Origami has been used extensively within education to illustrate complexity and learning theories (Polasek 2012). The ‘Fortune teller’ is a long-established children’s game made from one piece of folded paper. A series of questions are asked, based on Bloom’s (1956) domains of learning  and choices are made which correlate to fold-out sections which reveal the ‘fortune’ of the question asker.

Outcomes:

The Origami analogy therefore represents a debriefing model that is constructed and manipulated by the facilitator. Intended learning outcomes are on the outer, closed portion, when the facilitator(s) recognise a learning outcome as arising, a learning moment is identified. The scenario is paused and this moment is ‘opened’, developing into the analysis stage and including underpinning theory/knowledge. The group together consider all options until a consensus is reached about how to proceed, and this is further unfolded to reveal the deeper level complexities and explanations. Once complete, the moment is folded back into the ‘whole’, and the scenario continues.

Conclusions:

The Origami Debriefing Model can be used as a fluid, in-simulation activity, that is embedded within a dynamic process of unfolding learning moments as represented in the origami fortune-teller analogy. By working in this immediate way, learners receive clear direction and timely feedback on their performance. Additionally, the method promotes team discussion, sharing of practice dilemmas and options for progression into the next part of the scenario.

Presented By: Gill Langmack, University of Nottingham | Sally Wood, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust | Anna Davis, East Leake Medical Group Practice

Background: Following on from successfully implementing a situated e-learning package on sepsis in 2014 to address a lack of knowledge and understanding of the issues for patients by front-line staff (Davis et al, 2016), we developed a revised Sepsis package applying the NICE guidelines (2016) to a case-study.  We know from national CQUIN data (NHS England 2017) that sepsis is still not always recognised early and patients can deteriorate quickly with healthcare staff in a prime position to identify, escalate and treat early. Removing staff from clinical duties is becoming increasingly difficult so engaging, informative, up to date and accessible e-learning is essential to updating and understanding changing guidelines.

NICE guidelines for sepsis (2016) recommend that ALL healthcare staff should receive training annually and so providing a generic e-learning content which is adaptable to base line knowledge and therefore suitable to a range of health care staff was key.

The presentation will show-case the application of NICE guidelines to a case-study providing a template for others to utilise.  The updated e-learning Sepsis package was developed in collaboration between the local NHS Trust (Sepsis Lead Nurse, Sepsis Medical Lead, Consultant microbiologists and Antimicrobial Stewardship team were involved) and HEI School of Health Sciences (critical care lecturer and learning technologist) and ensures reference to antimicrobial stewardship consideration when considering sepsis.  Initially it was aimed at supporting qualified nurses and student nurses at the end of their training, however as we will show in the presentation, this package has since been extremely well received and is being mandated for both medical and nursing staff in NHS Trusts across the UK with outstanding independently offered feedback from several NHS consultants such as “This is one of the most useful and engaging e-learning packages and parts of mandatory training that I have seen – well done”. 

The Open Access nature of this e-learning means that the package is being used world-wide through the Health and e-learning Media Team (HELM) Open access portal.  We aim to show that collaboration of subject experts from clinical staff, e-learning and in developing learning technologies is essential to the production of world-class education. 

Acknowledgements:

James Henderson, Learning Technologist, Health and E-learning Media Team, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham (collaborator on the development and maintenance of this digital learning, but unable to be at the conference);

This project was initially funded with support from Health Education East Midlands

Poster Title - Developing clinical reasoning skills within Healthcare Students through the use of Simulation based teaching.

(Potentially fitting into the Patient Safety and Quality Outcome)

 

The poster presentation will demonstrate the use of Simulation within a Coventry University Physiotherapy Undergraduate teaching seminar aiming to improve students ability to clinically reason within a community setting (Patient's House).

Students were second year Physiotherapy students with no clinical experience to date. The session aimed to -

a) reduce anxiety around community working when on up coming placements

b) Allow students to clinically reason a number of scenarios within the patient house setting in small groups

c) Identify falls risks and ways to reduced these.

d) Consider patient and staff positioning to promote recovery.

 

Prior to the session a Flipped Learning approach was used, this allowed students to watch a video clip in their own time of a patient scenario, this provided them to observe their 'patient' within their home envionment, observe their walking, communication, difficulties in performing activities of daily living and their overall wellbeing. This then allowed students time to process the situation and consider the potential risks and needs of the patient. These ideas were then brought to the seminar and developed through a number of tasks. 

The session used clinical case studies for students to clinically reason and then role play with their planned interventions in small groups. Students took turns to role play the patient to experience what it is like to be handled and directed by members of staff. The use of MASK-Ed, a simulation patient suit to role play a service user was also used for a small group of students. This was incorporated into a visit to the departement by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (Photo avaliable for poster).

Student feedback was collected pre and post session to demonstrate their feeling towards community placement working which significantly changed due to the session. Additionally a problem based learning approach was used to introduce new concepts to the students and allow a transformative learning approach to the session. 

This poster will demonstrate the key Simulation aspects to the seminar and the significance of this to the student learning exeprience, this will be supported with evidence from the literature. It is hoped that this with stimulate significant conversation and ideas around the use of simulation with University students especially within healthcare. 

This session was developed and delivered by myself. Original ideas were then discussed with Jackie Shanley (Senior Lecture in Physiotherapy).

The simulation center at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) is designated as a CAE Healthcare Center of Excellence. In 2017, students from five educational programs within the School of Health and Life Sciences at NAIT as well as individuals playing the roles of registered nurses and physicians participated in a multiple-patient interprofessional simulation experience in our simulation centre.There were six synchronized scenarios happening at once which included a polypharm overdose, a mental illness consultation, a pediatric trauma and a palliative care patient among others.

This presentation will illustrate how to create a simulated emergency department. The presentation will also explain how to take individual scenarios and run them asynchronously while still integrating the scenario events to encompass the true nature of a high stress emergency environment. This type of environment allows us to assess interprofessional competencies in the truest form. 

This presentation will also summarize lessons learned based on both formal and informal feedback. Feedback was collected from both faculty and stduents who participated in the event. Finally, we will describe the future research opportunities arising as a result of the this simulation event.

Presented By: Karen Scullion, Lancashire teaching hospitals | Amanda Burton, Lancashire teaching hospitals | Mark Pimblett, Lancashire teaching hospitals | Chris Parry, Lancashire teaching hospitals | Aaron Ashford, Lancashire teaching hospitals | Winie Ellick, Lancashire teaching hospitals

Amanda Wilford has asked the team to provide a workshop that showcases Lucina birthing on all fours.  This provides conference attendees with insight into the versatility of Lucina and how they can incorporate this into their training sessions.  Proves that Lucina can be used by other health care pofessionals outside of the hospital setting, such as community midwives and paramedics.  Allows midwives to practise managing patients in realistic birthing positions, therefore improving competence and confidence which can lead to patient safety.

Lancashire Simulation Centre also have a simulated ambulance which they would like to bring to the conference to showcase their ability to provide realism for ambulance crews and hospital personal involved in transering patients.  The simbulance has cameras installed and can provide a live feed back to the classroom, this allows more people to learn through observation of the events taking place in the back of the simbulance. 

As the application of simulation in healthcare evolves, more simulation professionals strive to collaborate and develop new scenarios that meet interprofessional learning requirements and deliver the highest quality learning experience possible. More and more this requires collaboration between different groups or specialties. First and foremost, this requires teams to work together in an accessible, standardised way driven by learning outcomes.

This workshop will explore the challenges collaboration can present in scenario development. It will also present the web-based iRIS Simulation Authoring Platform as not only a solution to overcome these challenges, but as a platform to promote collaboration between simulation professionals in order to develop widely used and accepted high quality content without the need to “reinvent the wheel”.

iRIS will support you in:

• Ensuring your scenarios are developed in a standardised, high quality manner

• Creating significant efficiencies in terms of the time required for designing scenarios and collating simulation resources

• Reducing the time and effort required to train colleagues in the design and authoring of scenarios

• Building engagement with a wider range of clinicians to harness their expertise in developing new scenarios

• Driving interprofessional collaboration and sharing of content with other simulation professionals

Presented By: Clare Hawker, Cardiff University | Susan Ward, Cardiff University

Aim. To share our experiences of multicentre international collaboration to develop community simulation resources for undergraduate student nurses. Although work is well underway on our community care scenario, we would like to share our experience of transnational working. Using a SWOT analysis framework (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) we will present how we have developed into an effective working team, benefitting from the range of perspectives offered by transnational cooperation.

Simulation plays an important part in the education of nursing students (Cantt and Cooper 2010, Berragan 2013). It provides a safe environment for the practice of clinical and interpersonal skills.Enhancing the range of simulation scenarios to capture the realities and diversities of practice can be challenging. To help address this, funding from The Erasmus Strategic Partnerships for Higher Education programme has allowed ten European Universities to work together to design simulation resources for adult nursing students and also provide training for simulation champions.

With Malta University as the lead partner and coordinator, we are tasked with developing a simulation education resource for student nurses at novice level year 1, intermediate level year 2/3 and competent level year 3/4. Developing the scenario for novice student nurses are Cardiff University (CU) Wales, University of Molise Campobasso (UDM), Italyand Turku University of Applied Sciences (TUAS), Finland. We pooled intelligence gathered and set our focus on community based simulation.

Simulation for community settings has not developed at the same pace as hospital based acute care scenarios and we identified our opportunity to address this. In tandem with the development of the resources we will also be conducting evaluation of implementation across the partners European Universities to add to the body of evidence on community simulation with student nurses.The project involves transnational meetings in Malta,Finland, Norway and Italy and what we have come to appreciate is the enthusiasm for simulation education. We are really enjoying this opportunity to foster international health care simulation education and pave the way for future cooperation and collaboration.

Details


Travel Details

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway offers a peaceful retreat in a natural wildlife haven and is three miles from the city center

 

Nuthall Road, Nottingham
NG8 6AZ, United Kingdom 

TEL: +44-115-9794949

For more details on how to reach the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham-Gateway- please click here 
Please note there are 250 free parking spots available to delegates on the site. 

Travellers from afar:


By Air:

If you are traveling by air-there are a few airports that service the Nottingham area.

East Midlands is 15 miles from the hotel and estimated 20 minutes away.

Birmingham Airport is 50 miles from the hotel and estimated 50 minutes away.

Doncaster Sheffield Airport is 49 miles from the hotel and estimated 60 minutes away. 

 

By Train:

If you are traveling by train- please note that the Nottingham Train Station is a taxi ride away. The estimate price for a taxi is about £8-£12. For information and schedules - click here

If you are traveling by the Nottingham Tram- please note that the cloesest stops to the hotel are Cinderhill and Phoenix Park.   Please note that you must purchase your tickets before boarding on their website

Hotel Details

The official venue and conference hotel for HPSN UK 2018 is DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham-Gateway.

We are offering HPSN attendees a speical rate of £125/night Bed & Breakfast subject to availability. Click here to reserve your room

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway
Nuthall Road, Nottingham
NG8 6AZ, United Kingdom 
TEL: +44-115-9794949
FAX: +44-115-9797167

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Sponsors


Representative of a range of business entities and concerns, from corporate and governmental to private, public and not-for-profit, our sponsors provide the encouragement and assistance that helps HPSN deliver simulation-based learning and networking opportunities to the worldwide healthcare community. This year’s Human Patient Simulation Network Annual Conference (HPSN World 2017) provides several sponsorship opportunities to not only generate increased awareness for your products and services, but it also communicates a strong commitment to the guiding principles behind healthcare simulation.

Sponsorship Benefits

Sponsoring an HPSN World 2017 event will speak volumes to attendees, customers and potential investors about your company’s dedication to supporting simulation-based medical education for improving patient care. HPSN World 2017 offers tiered sponsorship opportunities to suit any budget. Contact us for details on Sponsorship Bundles to maximize the exposure of your brand.

Your logo on HPSN.com for one year
Multiple conference branding opportunities
Prominent listing as "Official Sponsor" of HPSN World 2017

Contact: Debra Roehl        Email: debra.roehl@cae.com        Tel: (941) 536-2850        Fax: (941) 377-5532        Attn: HPSN 2017 Convention SPONSORS

Exhibitors


Representative of a range of business entities and concerns, from corporate and governmental to private, public and not-for-profit, our sponsors provide the encouragement and assistance that helps HPSN deliver simulation-based learning and networking opportunities to the worldwide healthcare community. This year’s Human Patient Simulation Network Annual Conference (HPSN World 2017) provides several sponsorship opportunities to not only generate increased awareness for your products and services, but it also communicates a strong commitment to the guiding principles behind healthcare simulation.

Exhibitor Benefits

Exhibiting at an HPSN World 2017 event will speak volumes to attendees, customers and potential investors about your company’s dedication to supporting simulation-based medical education for improving patient care. HPSN World 2017 offers tiered sponsorship opportunities to suit any budget. Contact us for details on Sponsorship Bundles to maximize the exposure of your brand.

Access to more than 700 potential customers
Dedicated exhibit times
Daily traffic-boosting events

Contact: Sylva Sochor        Email: sylva.sochor@cae.com        Tel: (941) 536-2845        Fax: (941) 377-5532        Attn: HPSN 2017 Convention EXHIBITS