HPSN UK 2019

Nottingham, UK

December 3-4


DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway

Registration: Free

Announcements


We are now open for registrations and abstract submissions via the links on this page or by using the manual forms below.

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Content


Keynote Speakers

Keynote Speakers

We are delighted to bring four keynote speakers to this year's conference to cover the themes of simulation technologies and education strategies. In addition a number of pleanry speakers will be added to the programme. More details can be found above.

Day One Technology

Day One Technology

Day One of the conference will see a range of interactive workshops for the technological and creative minds out there. 

View Sessions

Day One Technology


CAE Maestro and Muse with modelled physiology allows manipulation of various patient parameters in order to present simulated patients with both normal and abnormal physiology and signs. Making changes to the physiology with Maestro and Muse is a simple but key step in the development of simulated experiences that accurately represent the chosen clinical case. This workshop will show, in easy to follow steps, the power of the software to generate a dynamic patient physiology that changes in real-time in response to deterioration or intervention. In addition, we will show how a wealth of data can be obtained during the clinical experience in order to deepen the enhance the learning experience.

Presented By: Ann Sunderland, Wynnefield Consulting

Difficulty recruiting and retaining clinical staff to support the increasing demand on NHS services is an increasing challenge (NHS Providers 2017). In an attempt to fill the gap, new roles such as physician associates, nursing associates, and assistant practitioners (BMA 2019), have been developed alongside NHS England's push to increase the number of advanced clinical practitioners.  These new roles together with implementation of the the new undergraduate nursing curriculum (from September 2019), has led to an exponential increase in the need for clinical assessments i.e. objective structured clinical assessments (OSCEs). Many of these assessments will be high stakes i.e. the learner's professional registration requires them to pass, so their development and delivery should be of a high standard ensuring that they test the required knowledge, skills and attitude of the learners.

 

This workshop aims to provide a platform to discuss current technical input into OSCEs and how this might be developed in the future.


Learning outcomes:
1. To have an awareness of the history and theory behind the use of OSCEs
2. To consider the role of the technician in relation to preparation, delivery and evaluation of OSCEs
3. To consider the use of audiovisual solutions to support learner and faculty development

 

References
BMA (2019). New Clinical Roles within the NHS. Available at: https://www.bma.org.uk/collective-voice/policy-and-research/education-training-and-workforce/new-clinical-roles. Accessed: 7 September 2019.
NHS Providers (2017). Workforce project: Initial analysis of issues facing the provider sector. Available at:  https://nhsproviders.org/media/3431/workforce-project-initial-analysis-of-issues-facing-the-provider-sector.pdf Accessed: 7 September 2019.

Presented By: Eszter Borján, Semmelweis University

Lucina childbirth simulator is suitable for monitoring the maternal and fetal parameters and simulating normal pregnancy, normal labour and delivery, birth with breech presentation, postpartum haemorrhage, mother's cardiac arrest, eclampsia, and shoulder dystocia. The device is incomparable in teaching fetal monitoring during the delivery because just like in the up-to-date delivery practice, the cardiotocography (CTG) is displayed on a screen, thus, the current state of the mother and fetus can be monitored.

The goal of this workshop is to present the features of CAE Lucina childbirth simulator and provide a hands-on experience in normal delivery and obstetrics emergencies, especially in the management of shoulder dystocia.

This workshop is  aimed at any technologist, simulationist  or  educator who is interested in creating  effective  simulation designs using  modalities such as interactive mannequins, hybrid simulation  and simulated patients to  create  a meaningful teaching and learning experience . Reference will be made to the ASPiH , INACSL and ASPE standards when creating  simulation based experiences (SBE)  . By thinking about  the 'how:'  when  designing  and incorporating   strategies such as 'simulation life savers' to ensure that learners are neither under or over stimulated when  undertaking SBE will in part ensure that  the learning environment is managed with the learners at the centre . Cognitive load theory will be introduced as a strategy to inform the design .  

 

This workshop is aimed at anyone who is new to simulation based education and those that support colleagues who themselves are new to simulation education,

As the application of simulation in healthcare evolves, more simulation professionals strive to collaborate and develop new scenarios that meet interprofessional learning requirements and deliver the highest quality learning experience possible. This often requires collaboration between different authors using different technologies and so a solution is needed to enable them to work together.

This workshop will explore the challenges collaboration can present in scenario development. It will present the web-based iRIS Simulation Authoring Platform as not only a solution to overcome these challenges, but as a platform to make scenario development and delivery far more efficient.

iRIS will support you in:

• ensuring your scenarios are developed in a standardised, high quality manner
• creating significant efficiencies in the time required for designing scenarios and collating simulation resources
• providing a central repository from which to store and manage your scenarios
• reducing the time and effort required to train colleagues in the authoring of scenarios
• building engagement with a wider range of SMEs to harness their expertise in developing new scenarios
• driving interprofessional collaboration and sharing of content with other simulation professionals
• reducing the time needed to set up simulations by exporting the same scenario to both CAE Maestro and Laerdal manikin software.

Presented By: Anthony Skehan, CAE | Joseph Pimley, CAE

Sounds a bit dull?

 

What we are really covering is how to get your CAE Juno running well and keeping it that way. From how to keep it clean and tidy, to what to do if it’s not behaving itself.

This will be an informal session to share ideas on getting the best from your simulator.

It is a chance for you to ask the questions and us to give the answers. What could be more exciting than that? Hopefully…

Presented By: Ahnold Sharp, CAE

Practical Hands-On Workshop

 

This workshop will demonstrate how to use the bleeding systems of both the Lucina and Apollo simulators and also how to care for and maintain the systems.

Presented By: Anthony Skehan, CAE | Joseph Pimley, CAE

Ares First Line Maintenance

An informal session on how to get the best from your CAE Ares. Learn the basics before we dive a little deeper and get to know more about the manikin!
Got a problem with your own? or just not sure how to make that scenario you're running go smoother!

Share your experiences and we'll find the answers.

Welcome Reception

Welcome Reception

Help us to Kick off HPSN UK 2019 by joining us for food, fun and drinks in the Product Showcase (Lavendar Lounge) Either Tuesday, 19th or Wednesday, June 20th at 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

Day Two Concurrent Sessions

Day Two Concurrent Sessions

Day Two of the conference will see a range of oral presentations, workshops and posters on simulation education strategies as a part of our concurrent sessions. Choose wisely.

View Sessions

Day Two Concurrent Sessions


Presented By: Nick White, Sheffield Hallam University | James Rumbold, Sheffield Hallam University | Iain Garner, Sheffield Hallam University

Mental-simulation can be defined as the cognitive visualisation of a task with a distinct absence of any overt physical movement (Arora et al., 2011). Mental-simulation has been used to enhance the learning of many different skills in many disciplines, including nursing, medicine, music and sport.  I am currently researching the experiences of pre-registration nurses after using a mental simulation for learning CPR skills, as CPR skills often decay quickly having implications for delivery of the skills.  The mental-simulation scenario script describes the imagined scenario and for this research an audio-script has been created to aid the participants with their visualising of the scenario.  

The scenario script aids the learner in creating the mentally-simulated images required for the task being learned.  To add authenticity the script was co-constructed using the self-described experiences of pre-registration nurses who had been personally involved in performing CPR in a clinical setting.   

Over a four-week period, twelve pre-registration nurse participants used the newly created mental simulation audio-script so they could visualise themselves undertaking CPR. The participants were then interviewed about their experiences of using the mental simulation for learning

Presented By: Claire Jones, Blackpool Teaching Hospital nhs Foundation Trust | Carol Park, Blackpool Teaching Hospital nhs Foundation Trust | Mark Hatch, Blackpool Teaching Hospital nhs Foundation Trust

The aim of in situ simulation on Delivery Suite was to use the resources and equipment  from the clinical area, and involve members of the multiprofessional healthcare team.

 

The training was delivered  in an attempt  to  improve situational awareness and develop  a shared understanding of complex clinical  situations as well as increasing  awareness of  other human factors and their impact.

 

 The training allowed  individuals to learn in a safe , collaborative multidisciplinary environment enabling familiarisation with equipment, storage and systems currently used  to improve patient safety.

Acknowledgements to the Simulation Team, the theatre Sister, Practice Development Midwives for the development and involvement in the training and the Theatre Practitioners for their enthusiasm and positivity.

Co-Authors: Carenzo L, Franc J, Montagnini C, Petrini F, Della Corte F, Ingrassia PL

 

BACKGROUND:
The transition of new residents from medical school to the post-graduate clinical environment remains challenging. We hypothesized that an introductory simulation course could improve new residents' performance in anesthesiology.

 

METHODS:
The Anesthesiology Residents Induction Month (ARIM) program was designed as a non-clinical simulation training program aiming at providing the theoretical and practical skills to safely approach, as junior anesthesiologists, the operating rooms. For each participant, specific knowledge, procedural skills and non-technical performance were assessed with a pre and post-test approach, before and immediately after the participation in the study.

 

RESULTS:
Fifteen first-month residents participated in the study. As compared to pre-test, residents significantly improved in all three evaluated areas. Pre-test knowledge assessment mean improved from 56% to 73% in the post-test (P<0.001). In the procedural skills assessment, pre-test mean improved from 43% to 77% (P<0.001) and non-technical skills assessment improved from 3.17 to 4.61 (in a scale out of seven points) in the post-test (P<0.001).

 

CONCLUSIONS:
Data suggest that an intensive simulation-based program can be an effective way for first-year residents to rapidly acquire and develop basic skills specific to anesthesiology. There might be benefits to begin residency with a training program aiming at developing and standardizing technical and non-technical skills.

Presented By: Richard Helyer, University of Bristol | Dawn Davies, University of Bristol

The University of Bristol Life Sciences schools have an established programme of outreach activities aimed at inspiring young people to join our undergraduate programmes and become the future generations of biomedical and health sciences professionals. Many of these activities are based on laboratory experiments that are possible to safely carry out on human subjects, for example ECG. In recent years we have extended and enhanced these activities by including manikin-based simulation sessions, where we can explore the boundaries of human physiology in ways that are not possible with our young visitors. We have developed a number of scenarios that demonstrate the physiology not only of health and disease, for example showing the effects of abuse of drugs or helping participants gain an understanding of the complex response of the body to stress but also of extremes, such as a simulated ascent to extreme altitude. The sessions are a blend of hands-on learning with more traditional instruction, for example, looking at the normal activity of the heart and response to exercise using ECG and then extending this understanding of the electrical activity of the heart using the mannikins to demonstrate disease states, such as cardiac arrest. We have provided these activities both in the university laboratories and at external locations such as schools and science fairs. These sessions are engaging, encourage interaction and have proven to be a highlight of our outreach activities. 

Manikin-based simulation was adopted some years ago as one teaching methodology in undergraduate health sciences and biosciences courses at the University of Bristol. The emphasis was not on developing skills or treatment, but on students gaining a deep understanding of key principles of physiology, typically resulting from on a challenge to the healthy body. More recently we have taken a different approach where experiences, although still primarily designed to demonstrate a depth of physiology, are based on pathophysiology and clinical cases. These tend to blend various learning methods during the session of which the simulation is a core aspect and include some ‘hands-on’ activities. Further, we are now able to efficiently deliver these experiences to very large groups (typically circa 140 students but there is no practical limit), either as stand-alone workshops or alongside existing practical classes. This presentation will discuss how we design our simulated experiences for physiology, how we face the challenges of large numbers of learners, and how simulation has become a core part of our curricula.

Presented By: Ann Sunderland, Wynnefield Consulting

A multitude of published evidence supports the use of simulation within clinical education. There is however still some reticence to fully utilise this pedagogy (McGaghie et al 2014), with anecdotal evidence suggesting that educators often pay lip service to simulation, delivering the occasional scenario within a module or course without embedding the pedagogy of simulation-based education within in. Often the focus is on the equipment rather than thinking about the most appropriate use simulation within the course/module and what the learning outcomes are. This misconception that simulation is a technology rather than a pedagogy is still alive and well and can ultimately lead to failure in maximising the learning opportunities available. Having an appropriate structure and taking the time to carefully plan the use of simulation within a course/module can be rewarding for both learners and faculty alike.

This presentation offers a potential structure and rationale focusing on how and when to utilise clinical simulation and the processes and requirements needed to ensure its ongoing success (Barrott et al 2013 and Sunderland 2019).

Presented By: Eszter Borján, Semmelweis University

Lucina childbirth simulator is suitable for monitoring the maternal and fetal parameters and simulating normal pregnancy, normal labour and delivery, birth with breech presentation, postpartum haemorrhage, mother's cardiac arrest, eclampsia, and shoulder dystocia. The device is incomparable in teaching fetal monitoring during the delivery because just like in the up-to-date delivery practice, the cardiotocography (CTG) is displayed on a screen, thus, the current state of the mother and fetus can be monitored.

The goal of this workshop is to present the wide range of possibilities in different education programs with Lucina and provide a hands-on experience in normal delivery and obstetrics emergencies.

This interactive workshop will focus on a different approach to  think  about implementing simulation based education in clinical settings in primary , secondary or tertiary care . Drawing on the work of Lave and Wenger ( 1991) , the workshop will explore how individuals or groups who have a shared interest learn together by sharing their  experiences.  Becoming a  group or community they develop personally and professionally . The term  ‘community of practice’ encompasses all those who are involve in any given  community such as those working in practice who are keen to implement this  pedagogy . Case studies will be used to illustrate this view of social learning and provide suggestions on how this may be used in your organization.

Lave, J. & Wenger, E (1991) Situated Learning; Legitimate peripheral participation .   Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 

Presented By: Kate O'Connor, Dudley Group of Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust | Jacqueline Howells, Dudley Group of Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

On average, the life expectancy of those with a learning disability is drastically reduced, in men it is by 18 years and by 14 years for women; when compared to the general population (MENCAP, n.d.). 

 

Summary of Education Programme

An education programme was devised at our Trust to help break down some of the barriers faced by learning disability patients. The education programme is offered to a multidisciplinary group of second year nursing students and fourth year medical students. The course consists of theoretical teaching and simulation scenarios delivered by a range of experts. The simulation design used real-life actors with a learning disability that played the role of the patients; these actors were recruited from a local advocacy group. The two scenarios focused on completing a pre-operative checklist for a gastroscopy and the assessment and management of a post-op patient in pain. The debrief was led by both our Learning Disability Liaison Nurse and the Simulation Lead, with input from the actors. 

 

Summary of results 

Overall the participants found the simulation sessions useful and stated that their confidence had improved in regards to dealing with patients with learning disabilities. Another common theme highlighted through the feedback, was that the participants found it particularly useful having the input of the actors during the debriefings. 

 

Discussion

This innovative approach demonstrated beneficial learning. 

 

Conclusion

Overall feedback from both professions was very positive about the structure of the programme and the use of actors for the simulation.

Presented By: Ann Sunderland, ASPiH

Aim

To support individuals and organisations wishing to quality assure their simulation delivery through ASPiH accreditation.

 

Objectives

  1. To gain an overview of the benefits of accreditation
  2. To understand the accreditation process
  3. To determine suitable supporting evidence
  4. To be aware of support mechanisms in place

 

Background

The ASPiH Standards for Simulation Based Education in Healthcare were published in 20161. Two years later, in January 2018, the accreditation process was launched, recognising individuals, programmes and organisations who successfully demonstrated meeting these standards. Gaining accreditation provides a quality assurance mechanism that helps improve the quality, safety and effectiveness of patient care by advancing excellence in simulation-based education.

 

Workshop

This workshop will provide an overview of the accreditation process from the perspective of the reviewer and applicant. Examples will be shared of the benefits to accreditation and an opportunity will be provided to discuss any issues

Presented By: Peter Dickens, Kliniskt Tränings Centrum, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden

Tired of writing long winded and overly complicated patient cases? Bored of presenting the same patient over and over again? Worried that you might not be able to show genuinely honest curiosity over events that you are expecting to happen?

You won't be, with our Random Patient Generator

Uppsala University Hospitals clinical training centre have developed their interprofesssonal simulation sessions to include patient cases generated by the students themselves wit the help of a Random Patient Generator and a set of dice.

This session concentrates on the benefits and drawbacks of allowing the participants themsleves to generate the conditions surround a patient case, and then for that case to be delivered immediately in the theatre of simulation.

Presented By: David Morgan, University of Bristol

At the University of Bristol’s BioMedSim Centre, we use simulation in a large group learning environment, embedded as a core part of undergraduate curricula for medicine and biomedical sciences. Although our sessions are manikin-based, the focus is observation of real-time changes in physiology (using Müse, CAE Healthcare) during simulated clinical experiences (e.g. diabetic ketoacidosis) or as a result of physiological challenge (e.g. hypoxia from altitude).  

 

Manikin-based simulation is not usually associated with large-group teaching. We have consolidated small-group sessions due to greater student numbers, which encouraged us to explore ways to introduce this technology to enhance theoretical teaching to be more 'hands-on'. 

 

A simulation session consists of:

an academic/facilitator
technician
small number of self-selected students interacting with the manikin,
observers on several screens in the teaching room.

 

The technician will switch content delivered to the screens during the session, blending real-time clinical monitoring displays with other learning resources such as ABGs or scans, PowerPoint slides showing additional data/key learning points, or live streaming group interaction with manikin. Therefore, each session is rich in a range of learning materials that together deliver the overall learning experience.

 

Students respond positively towards this style of teaching as it is more interactive than didactic and allows complex subjects to be explained in ways that may be more effective for kinaesthetic and visual learners. It has considerably reduced overall teaching and preparation time for academic and technical staff. Students have reported this method to be a highlight of early-years undergraduate curriculum.

Presented By: Scott Howard, University of Chester | Sean Baker, University of Chester

In situ facilitation of simulated learning.  Scott Howard / Sean Baker, University of Chester

 

Clinical Simulation is a vital aspect of our pre-registration nurse education programme allowing students to consolidate and develop theory knowledge and practice skills in a controlled environment. The In-situ facilitation approach aids student development by enabling facilitators to be embedded into the simulation taking on various roles to enhance the experience of the students maximising learning opportunities. This style of facilitation is something we have been doing at Chester for the last 4 years and it evolves every year as we adapt in reaction to the student’s feedback as well as facilitator reflection.

The simulation occurs at the end of the second year for a one week, consisting of scenarios representing aspects of community and acute nursing care. The acute care aspect concentrates on the nursing care of 4 patients through an evolving scenario involving eight nursing shifts over two days.

This Simulated Clinical Experience (S.C.E) has been designed to enhance and develop students’ knowledge and skills which they have learnt throughout years one and two. This allows students to practice skills they may have had limited access to during or feel less confident to undertake whilst on clinical placement, as students receive different learning experiences in practice. This session has been developed to allow not only facilitated learning by faculty staff but also peer led learning as students can share their knowledge and experiences.

During the S.C.E the clinical picture of each patient develops according the interventions undertaken by students in relation to each individual case.  This adds to the realism of the scenario creating valuable leaning outcomes for the students. The patient profiles and conditions are also designed to enable the students to experience a wide variety of skills, including, communication, documentation, decision making and collaborative working along with clinical skills.

 

In-situ facilitation enables the facilitators to interact with the students, observing their practice and knowledge providing support where necessary compared with being hidden away behind a screen. This improves safety of the environment and allows for greater formative assessment of the student’s knowledge and skills through which students can be guided to where they have a lack of knowledge and/or skills in preparation for their third year.

As the application of simulation in healthcare evolves, more simulation professionals strive to collaborate and develop new scenarios that meet interprofessional learning requirements and deliver the highest quality learning experience possible. This often requires collaboration between different authors using different technologies and so a solution is needed to enable them to work together.

This workshop will explore the challenges collaboration can present in scenario development. It will present the web-based iRIS Simulation Authoring Platform as not only a solution to overcome these challenges, but as a platform to make scenario development and delivery far more efficient.

iRIS will support you in:

• ensuring your scenarios are developed in a standardised, high quality manner
• creating significant efficiencies in the time required for designing scenarios and collating simulation resources
• providing a central repository from which to store and manage your scenarios
• reducing the time and effort required to train colleagues in the authoring of scenarios
• building engagement with a wider range of SMEs to harness their expertise in developing new scenarios
• driving interprofessional collaboration and sharing of content with other simulation professionals
• reducing the time needed to set up simulations by exporting the same scenario to both CAE Maestro and Laerdal manikin software.

Presented By: Laura Harrison, University Hospital Bristol NHS Foundation Trust | Hayley Lear, University Hospital Bristol NHS Foundation Trust

Background: Evidence suggests from a young age people are making decisions about their careers (1). Outreach programmes give young people real hands on experience supporting raising aspirations and development (2). 

 

Aim: To raise awareness of the variety of NHS careers available to 220 year sevens at a Bristol Secondary school. 

 

Method:  We created a simulated patient journey from road traffic accident to discharge, followed by a Q&A session. 
 

Results and Discussion: 197 (90%) students completed post event questionnaires. 27.4% (n=54) strongly agreed and 41.1% (n=81) agreed they would recommend the day to others. 23.9% (n=47) of the students stated the day had encouraged them to pursue an NHS career. The students are aged 11-12 years and the national curriculum supports the students over the next five years to make decisions about their careers. Therefore 76.1% remaining unsure would not be unreasonable.  71.6% (n=141) of the students strongly agreed or agreed they had a better understanding of NHS careers. We believe this to be because the students took part in activities which replicated professional's tasks, talked to professionals about their NHS roles, challenges and qualifications.

 

Conclusion: A multi-professional patient journey simulation day can impact upon young people to have an improved awareness of NHS careers. 

Over the last 18 months the University of Chester has agreed and begun to implement a new strategy for simulation, investing in the physical environment, resources and support of simulation design, facilitation and debrief.  As a result of the simulation strategy the University of Chester has developed an Arts and Health collaboration between the Faculty of Health and Social Care and the Philip Barker Centre for Creative Learning, bringing together drama and healthcare education to create a fully immersive learning environment.  Combining immersive simulation environments with Immersive Theatre theories, principles and practice the University has created a learning experience in which the student actively engages with an environment that represents real life and clinically accurate work situations over the course of one day in an acute setting. To undertake this collaboration a dramatist worked with a group of mixed aged volunteers in a series of workshops that acted as an intensive ‘introduction to acting’ to enable them to inhabit a specifically designed role based on real life characters developed by a interprofessional team.  The level of immersion the students demonstrated through interaction with the volunteer actors enabled the student to demonstrate their clinical ability in providing person centred care. This was only possible as a result of the students interacting with the volunteer actors who were able to consistently sustain and adapt their role in response to the clinical setting and student interaction. This in combination with a clinical environment that truly represents the practice setting resulted in the students feeling as though they were on placement, rather than a setting that the learner perceived as being fake and therefore were able to work with the multi professional team to respond to clinical situations and make clinical decisions as they arose. Facilitating this was the inclusion of Adult Nursing, Mental Health Nursing, Learning Disabilities Nursing, Physician Associate Students, Specialist Medical Registrar.  Placing these professionals in an evolving immersive simulation was possible through the volunteer actors providing the catalyst for student interaction with what they perceived to be real people.

Speakers


Tuesday December 3rd

Professor Bob Stone

Wednesday December 4th

Professor Terry Young

Dr Alan Platt

Professor Robert J. Stone<br> BSc (Hons), MSc, C.Psychol, AFBPsS, CErgHF, FIEHF Academician (IHEAS, Moscow)

Professor Robert J. Stone
BSc (Hons), MSc, C.Psychol, AFBPsS, CErgHF, FIEHF Academician (IHEAS, Moscow)

Bob Stone, a Chartered Psychologist, Human Factors specialist and a 32-year veteran of the international Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality community, is Director of the of the Human Interface Technologies (HIT) Team at the University of Birmingham. Bob established the world’s first industrial VR team at the UK’s National Advanced Robotics Centre, following an appearance on the BBC’s 9 O’Clock News in January, 1993, and for...

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Professor Terry Young<br>Bsc (Hons), PhD

Professor Terry Young
Bsc (Hons), PhD

Terry Young graduated from the University of Birmingham, UK, in Physics and Electrical Engineering before pursuing a PhD. He worked for GEC and then Marconi from 1985-2001, first in designing photonic components for optical communications, then in systems design and business development, before moving into medical systems. He was Professor of Healthcare Systems at Brunel University London from 1985-2001 and continues to hold an emeritus chair.  His healthcare research focused on the value of...

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Dr Alan Platt<br>Prof Doc (Ed), MSc, PG Dip Ed, BSc (Hons), RGN, LPE, FHEA

Dr Alan Platt
Prof Doc (Ed), MSc, PG Dip Ed, BSc (Hons), RGN, LPE, FHEA

Alan is an Associate Professor of Simulation Based Education (SBE) at Northumbria University, a leadership role that encompasses both the development of SBE across the undergraduate/post graduate programmes and collaborative SBE partnerships at a regional national and international level. Alan has over 15 years SBE experience and, following a career in critical care as a charge nurse and lecturer practitioner, he joined Northumbria University as a senior lecturer in 2006. During this time, he developed his...

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Amar Patel, DHSc, MS, NRP, CHSE, FSSH

Amar Patel, DHSc, MS, NRP, CHSE, FSSH

Amar Patel is a clinician, researcher, and renowned educator with a Doctorate in Health Science from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and a Master of Science in Emergency Health Services Education from the University of Maryland Baltimore County.  He currently serves as chief learning officer at CAE Healthcare.   Founder and past chair of the North Carolina Simulation Collaborative, Dr. Patel is a simulation expert and much-published key opinion leader with 60+...

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Agenda


Day One - Focus on Simulation Technologies 

Features presentations and interactive workshops focused on the technologies surrounding simulation in healthcare education. 

Day Two - Focus on Education Strategies 

Brings together leading healthcare educators from around the globe for interactive workshops and presentations. 

*Agenda Subject to Change

December 03, 2019

Registration - Tea & Coffee

Opening Session

Keynote Presentation - 'Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality for Medical Applications ... PLEASE Remember the Human!'

Professor Robert J. Stone

Groups Organised for 3 Interactive Rotation Sessions

Interactive Stations - Rotation 1

Tea & Coffee in Product Showcase

Interactive Stations - Rotation 2

Interactive Stations - Rotation 3

Lunch

Technology Workshop 1

Technology Workshop 2

Tea & Coffee in Product Showcase

Keynote Presentation

Amar Patel

Plenary Session

Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare

December 04, 2019

Registration - Tea & Coffee

Opening Session

Keynote Presentation - 'Digital twins, prototypes and simulators: what’s the future for service training and delivery?'

Professor Terry Young

Tea & Coffee in Product Showcase

Concurrent Session I

Concurrent Session II

Lunch

Electronic poster walk begins 1315

Keynote Presentation - 'Theory to practice: the simulation connection'

Dr Alan Platt

Plenary Session

Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare

Closing Session

Venue &
Accommodations


DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway offers a peaceful retreat in a natural wildlife haven and is three miles from the city center

 

Nuthall Road, Nottingham
NG8 6AZ, United Kingdom 

TEL: +44-115-9794949

HPSN UK 2019


We'd hope that you can use the links on this page but should you run into difficulty with the registration or abstract submission process you can download manual forms here:

HPSN UK 2019 Registration Form

HPSN UK 2019 Abstract Submission Form

Join us in December to network with educators, technologists, technicians, facilitators, nurses, doctors, midwives, allied health, patient safety leads et al, and celebrate the technology and education behind simulation as a pedagogy to improve and enhance patient care. The two-day conference is... Read More

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Details


Travel Details

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway offers a peaceful retreat in a natural wildlife haven and is three miles from the city center

 

Nuthall Road, Nottingham
NG8 6AZ, United Kingdom 

TEL: +44-115-9794949

For more details on how to reach the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham-Gateway- please click here 
Please note there are 250 free parking spots available to delegates on the site. 

Travellers from afar:


By Air:

If you are traveling by air-there are a few airports that service the Nottingham area.

East Midlands is 15 miles from the hotel and estimated 20 minutes away.

Birmingham Airport is 50 miles from the hotel and estimated 50 minutes away.

Doncaster Sheffield Airport is 49 miles from the hotel and estimated 60 minutes away. 

 

By Train:

If you are traveling by train- please note that the Nottingham Train Station is a taxi ride away. The estimate price for a taxi is about £8-£12. For information and schedules - click here. 

If you are traveling by the Nottingham Tram- please note that the cloesest stops to the hotel are Cinderhill and Phoenix Park.   Please note that you must purchase your tickets before boarding on their website. 

Hotel Details

The official venue and conference hotel for HPSN UK 2018 is DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham-Gateway.

We are offering HPSN attendees a speical rate of between £119-£129/night Bed & Breakfast depending on the nights you stay subject to availability.To take advantage of this rate please Click here to reserve your room

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Nottingham - Gateway
Nuthall Road, Nottingham
NG8 6AZ, United Kingdom 
TEL: +44-115-9794949
FAX: +44-115-9797167

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Sponsors


Representative of a range of business entities and concerns, from corporate and governmental to private, public and not-for-profit, our sponsors provide the encouragement and assistance that helps HPSN deliver simulation-based learning and networking opportunities to the worldwide healthcare community. This year’s Human Patient Simulation Network Annual Conference (HPSN World 2019) provides several sponsorship opportunities to not only generate increased awareness for your products and services, but it also communicates a strong commitment to the guiding principles behind healthcare simulation.

Sponsorship Benefits

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Multiple conference branding opportunities
Prominent listing as "Official Sponsor" of HPSN World 2019

Contact: Debra Roehl        Email: debra.roehl@cae.com        Tel: (941) 536-2850        Fax: (941) 377-5532        Attn: HPSN 2019 Convention SPONSORS

Exhibitors


Representative of a range of business entities and concerns, from corporate and governmental to private, public and not-for-profit, our sponsors provide the encouragement and assistance that helps HPSN deliver simulation-based learning and networking opportunities to the worldwide healthcare community. This year’s Human Patient Simulation Network Annual Conference (HPSN World 2017) provides several sponsorship opportunities to not only generate increased awareness for your products and services, but it also communicates a strong commitment to the guiding principles behind healthcare simulation.

Exhibitor Benefits

Exhibiting at an HPSN World 2017 event will speak volumes to attendees, customers and potential investors about your company’s dedication to supporting simulation-based medical education for improving patient care. HPSN World 2017 offers tiered sponsorship opportunities to suit any budget. Contact us for details on Sponsorship Bundles to maximize the exposure of your brand.

Access to more than 700 potential customers
Dedicated exhibit times
Daily traffic-boosting events

Contact: Sylva Sochor        Email: sylva.sochor@cae.com        Tel: (941) 536-2845        Fax: (941) 377-5532        Attn: HPSN 2017 Convention EXHIBITS